Bats in trees

Posted by Ecosulis Consulting Team on 3/02/2016
The Third Edition of the Bat Conservation Trust Good Practice Guidelines (sponsored by Ecosulis) have just been released. Here is an overview of what you need to know, and how it may affect your upcoming projects.

 

Bat surveys are usually required to inform planning applications for the site, and range from roost emergence/swarming surveys to bat activity surveys.

The key changes within the guidelines include:

 

Posted by Annie Hatt BSc (Hons) on 6/04/2016

In March this year I was lucky enough to be enrolled on a Tree Climbing and Aerial Rescue course at Bridgwater College, Cannington. Running up to the course I was fortunate to have the support of a colleague Ben, from our ecological consultancy team, who already had his Tree Climbing qualification and is an experienced climber. He gave me a great deal of insight prior to the course, however, nothing could prepare me for the physical work that was involved!

Posted by Marc Anderton on 17/02/2015

Ecosulis have recently completed a large scale infrastructure project in Lancashire. The primary focus of the job was to climb and inspect mature trees to assess the potential of tree cavities to support roosting bats.

The work was undertaken by Mark Anderton and Ben Mitchell (licensed bat ecologist) and once up in the tree canopy, the principle role of the inspection involved using an endoscope to inspect the full extent of the cavity. The first stage is evidently checking for the presence or absence of roosting bats, although no bats were recorded in this instance.