Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 31/10/2014

Ecosulis attended the Bristol University Internship Career’s Fair on 30 October 2014. The aim of the fair is to assist environmental and science students with their chosen career, and to offer placements to give potential ecologists relevant work experience.

Ecosulis work closely with several universities, including Bristol University, offering placements and interships to graduates and students studying an environmental degree, and with a passion for ecology.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 27/08/2014

Himalayan Balsam is a non-native invasive species, and is commonly found along river banks and watercourses. The species is listed in Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, under which it is an offence to plant or otherwise cause to grow the plant in the wild. The species spreads quickly on sites as it out-competes native wildlife and spreads rapidly.  The plant spreads using its seed pods, which explode when touched scattering seeds up to 7m away.  Seeds are also spread by water and may remain viable within the soil for up to two years (Environment Agency, 2010). 

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 25/06/2014

New water vole guidelines are set to be released towards the end of this year. There are likely to be some significant changes to the way water vole surveys need to be undertaken, and how water vole mitigation strategies can be implemented. Some of the key changes are detailed below:

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 22/04/2014

Ecosulis recently donated 500 dormouse tubes to the Somerset Wildlife Trust, which were previously used on one of our large infrastructure projects. The tubes will be used within dormouse monitoring schemes and other initiatives by the trust. Monitoring works are undertaken to provide an indication of population size and the health of dormouse populations in Somerset and the south west.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 13/03/2014

Surveys

Great crested newts have a very limited survey season. Presence/absence and population surveys can only be undertaken when newts are in the ponds for breeding, which is usually between mid-March and mid-June. At least half the surveys must be undertaken between mid-April and mid-May. Surveys comprise between 4 and 6 survey visits, and torch searches, bottle trapping and egg searches are usually required. Habitat assessments can be undertaken all year round.

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