Blogs

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 3/11/2014

Natural England is planning to launch a new development bat licence. The Bat Low Impact Licence is designed to simplify the licensing of certain bat projects and would streamline licence applications for schemes that have a low impact on bat roosts. This would include impacts on small roosts of the more widespread bats, such as works affecting a summer transitory roost for one or two individual common pipistrelle bats.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 31/10/2014

Ecosulis attended the Bristol University Internship Career’s Fair on 30 October 2014. The aim of the fair is to assist environmental and science students with their chosen career, and to offer placements to give potential ecologists relevant work experience.

Ecosulis work closely with several universities, including Bristol University, offering placements and interships to graduates and students studying an environmental degree, and with a passion for ecology.

The rapid progress of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) was clearly demonstrated to attendees of the Europe and Central Asia plenary meeting in Basel 22-23 September.  Whilst most attendees were government representatives, Dr Alan Feest from Ecosulis attended as a recognised researcher on the measurement of biodiversity. 

It is estimated that there are around 4,128 Sites of Specific Scientific Interest in England (SSSIs). With construction picking up across the UK there is a danger that building work and infrastructure projects could potentially disturb these sites. In the past identifying these areas and working around them could prove tricky and would require detailed assessments to be included in impact assessment. This is now aided by the introduction of a new online tool that allows developers and their consultants to see at a glance where these areas area and the risk of potential impact.
When people talk about wildlife and ecosystems they often talk of preserving them, although this is a limited view and is often typical of people and naturalists who are attached to habitats and species as they knew them in their lifetime only. This condition is often referred to as Shifting Baseline Syndrome and what is often not realised is that it is also possible to restore local habitats to the state they once were, to a state that is richer in biodiversity and healthier for people.
 
Posted by Marc Anderton on 15/09/2014

Priory Farm is located within the rural landscape of the Wansdyke District and consists of four conjoined barns, which were due for renovation. During the ecological surveys in 2010, three of the four barns had evidence of brown long-eared and common pipistrelle bats, whilst a single lesser horseshoe bat was also recorded within one of the barns.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 27/08/2014

Himalayan Balsam is a non-native invasive species, and is commonly found along river banks and watercourses. The species is listed in Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, under which it is an offence to plant or otherwise cause to grow the plant in the wild. The species spreads quickly on sites as it out-competes native wildlife and spreads rapidly.  The plant spreads using its seed pods, which explode when touched scattering seeds up to 7m away.  Seeds are also spread by water and may remain viable within the soil for up to two years (Environment Agency, 2010). 

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 25/06/2014

New water vole guidelines are set to be released towards the end of this year. There are likely to be some significant changes to the way water vole surveys need to be undertaken, and how water vole mitigation strategies can be implemented. Some of the key changes are detailed below: