Blogs

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 28/07/2015

This month saw the launch of Rewilding Britain, which is a charity set up to encourage rewilding projects across the UK. This includes enhancing biodiversity and natural habitats across the country, as well as improving our health and wellbeing through the enjoyment of natural areas. Rewilding is also frequently associated with the reintroduction of key species back to the UK, including beavers (which are already in parts of Scotland and Devon), pine martens, lynx and eventually wolves.

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Posted by Annie Hatt on 21/07/2015

Great crested newts (Tritiurus cristatus) are well known within ecological consultancy as they are a protected species which often crop up within areas of proposed development. They are sensitive creatures which are vulnerable to water changes and therefore suffer due to natural forces including; ponds overgrowing, shallowing and eutrophication, as well as non-natural forces; industrial water pollution, destruction and drainage of ponds, introduced predatory fish and habitat fragmentation. But there may be another force to add into the mix…

Posted by Annie Hatt on 22/06/2015

Entering the world of Ecosuils seemed like a daunting task when I stepped into the office in early June as a brand new member of the team. As with starting at any new job, there were unfamiliar faces and surroundings, a million new things to learn and remember; from computer systems and timetables to names and responsibilities of all the people in the office. A daunting task for anyone, regardless of their confidence level.

Over the last 25 years Ecosulis has developed a tried and tested method for establishing reedbeds in a variety of situations. Our experts know that each site has its unique set of challenges and these need to be considered systematically in order to ensure that you can establish a successful reedbed. Where we have been commissioned by clients to repair or restore failed reedbeds, we have identified factors that are often not considered by those installing them. This article outlines some of those key issues and provides solutions to them. 
 
 
Posted by Sarah Booley on 7/04/2015

Ecosulis has been engaging with clients about biodiversity valuation and the principle of No Net Loss through our programme of Continued Professional Development (CPD) presentations. We have recently been invited to speak at the offices of some of our largest clients such as BAM Nuttall to provide further information on these principles.

Posted by Sarah Booley on 30/03/2015

Earlier this year Natural England approved a licence to allow a family of beavers which had been living along the River Otter in Devon to remain in the wild (click here for more information). Issued to Devon Wildlife Trust who are responsible for managing the beavers this five year licence was subject to a number of conditions. A key condition was that the beavers on site are tested to confirm that they are European beavers and are free from parasites.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 26/02/2015

Technology and biodiversity are two concepts that are usually viewed as polar opposites. However, the source of technical advances are often inspired from the natural world. Species in particular that have evolved to a certain role or niche provide unique opportunities for us to learn and develop technology and materials. Maintaining high levels of biodiversity will protect the vast range of species and their evolutionary functions, some of which could be utilised to improve our way of life.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 26/02/2015

Rewilding is an increasingly popular concept which involves restoring large areas back to their natural state, and the reintroduction of species that have recently been extinct. This ranges from the reintroduction of bison, big cats and bears into Europe, as well as smaller reintroductions such as the recent reintroduction of beavers in the UK.

Posted by Marc Anderton on 17/02/2015

Ecosulis have recently completed a large scale infrastructure project in Lancashire. The primary focus of the job was to climb and inspect mature trees to assess the potential of tree cavities to support roosting bats.

The work was undertaken by Mark Anderton and Ben Mitchell (licensed bat ecologist) and once up in the tree canopy, the principle role of the inspection involved using an endoscope to inspect the full extent of the cavity. The first stage is evidently checking for the presence or absence of roosting bats, although no bats were recorded in this instance.

Posted by Suzi Day and Cain Blythe on 17/02/2015

In 1990, Ecosulis was a family owned business set up by Dave and Ali Green. Ecosulis was run from the family home and grew by addressing clients needs at the time, by offering applied ecological knowledge, technical capability and a strong commercial awareness.

Over the twenty five years since, the business has expanded and has a presence throughout the UK and offices in Bath, Exeter, Monmouth, Chester and London. The HQ is based in a 3,000sq ft Rickyard (seed store) located between Bristol and Bath.