Blogs

Posted by Sarah Booley on 22/01/2016
In the final European Protected Species (EPS) Mitigation Licensing Newsletter of 2015, Natural England set out a number of important items including new information, reminders and other useful information which will help with the submission of EPS Licence applications, particularly those relating to bats and GCN.
 

Pre-submission Screening Service (PSS) for Wildlife Licensing

Posted by Annie Hatt on 13/01/2016

It’s no secret bats are known, by some, as pests ‘invading’ homes and terrifying families. Blood sucking, ugly, diseased creatures often found in grave yards or swarming around haunted houses. Searching the internet, it is astounding the number of ‘pest’ control companies talking in this way about bats. In all fairness as an ecologist who surveys bats on a regular basis and completely intrigued by their behaviour, my opinion is a completely bias one.

Posted by Ben Mitchell BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 14/12/2015

Grey long-eared bats are one of the UKs rarest bat species and their range was considered to be restricted to the south western coast of England only; however, a recent update from Natural England reveals just how far north they have colonised. Quite the opposite is true of the closely related brown long eared bat as it is one of our most common and widespread bat species in the UK.

Cain Blythe and Daniel Allen cover two revealing articles for Geographical magazine as part of Rewilding Week:

Bear Necessities: http://geographical.co.uk/nature/wildlife/item/1389-bear-necessities

Fewer than 50 Marsican brown bears roam the Apennine Mountains of central Italy. Daniel Allen and Cain Blythe investigate whether new protection measures can bring Italy’s largest carnivore back from the edge.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 24/11/2015

Ecosulis are now offering a Pioneering Pre-Acquisition Rapid Risk Assessment to allow an initial ecological site assessment to be made at the pre-acquisition stage. Ecology can have timing constraints and constraints to layouts, especially where notable habitats or protected species are present. There are too many projects where ecological consultants are brought in at a late stage when the layout has been fixed, and as a result it can be difficult and expensive to change the layout to accommodate ecological mitigation.

Posted by Annie Hatt on 24/11/2015

A recent article was posted by Claire Marshall, a BBC Environment Correspondent, in which she explains that new hunting laws relating to wolves in France are causing a stir. The problem is that local sheep farmers claim to be losing stock through predation and this has resulted in the French Government increasing the number of wolves that can be killed in 2015 from 25 to 36. A wolf hunting team is now supplied by the state in defiance of EU law.

Posted by Alice Chaimberlain on 2/11/2015

I was first introduced to Ecosulis at Bristol University’s Internship career fair back in October 2014. At that time I hadn’t even heard of ecological consultancy as a career option, but after talking to staff I was keen to find out more and get involved.

Now I’ve reached the end of my internship and although I still have much more to learn, my summer at Ecosulis has allowed me to explore many different aspects of ecological consultancy from research collection, surveying, mapping and report writing whilst getting involved with conservation directly to protect British wildlife.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 22/10/2015

Beavers often get bad press for being the cause of flooding, and this is one of the key factors affecting the decision of whether to reintroduce beavers to Britain’s waterways. Heavy rain has caused flooding in Alyth Burn in Scotland, and many theories have linked this flooding to the presence of beavers in the area.

A “one in 200 year flood” occurred this summer and this caused extensive flash flooding within the village of Alyth, leaving homes without power.