Blogs

Posted by Emma Northcote-Smith on 21/06/2016

In 2016 The Mammal Society Mitigation Guidance Series published the new Water Vole Mitigation Handbook. This publication aims to promote best practice in the surveying and mitigation of water voles by ecological consultants, and to guide and inform decision makers that suitable survey information is provided and suitable mitigation measures proposed (Dean et al., 2016).

The new mitigation guidelines include some key changes to:

·         Licensing in relation to the ‘displacement’ of water voles

Posted by James Edwards on 6/05/2016

The year started with the launch of one of our largest native woodland planting projects this year. As part of the Gatwick Airport Flood Alleviation Scheme, Ecosulis’ HCEC Team were asked to conduct a five-year habitat creation and maintenance program for the Environment Agency in Crawley. Our task for the first phase of works in 2016, was to plant over 4,500 trees and shrubs to create a new woodland habitat that would be beneficial to the Dormice that have been found in adjacent woodland around the site.

Posted by Annie Hatt BSc (Hons) on 6/05/2016

Hedgehog awareness week kicks off this week and the Ecological Consulting Team at Ecosulis are helping to spread the word!  

The British Hedgehog Preservation Society are running Hedgehog Awareness Week for another year, and this time it is focusing on strimming and garden machinery. Every year hundreds of hedgehogs are injured or killed as a result of coming into contact with machinery. You can help prevent this simply by checking areas for hedgehogs before using machines! 

Posted by Annie Hatt BSc (Hons) on 6/04/2016

In March this year I was lucky enough to be enrolled on a Tree Climbing and Aerial Rescue course at Bridgwater College, Cannington. Running up to the course I was fortunate to have the support of a colleague Ben, from our ecological consultancy team, who already had his Tree Climbing qualification and is an experienced climber. He gave me a great deal of insight prior to the course, however, nothing could prepare me for the physical work that was involved!

At a time that most ecological consultants are out undertaking great crested newt surveys and developers are squeezing in last minute commissions for 2016 the BBC News and Ecosulis are also considering what the future holds for this European Protected Species (EPS). 

Posted by Sarah Booley on 8/03/2016

We didn’t have a particularly cold winter, however amphibians are now starting to move towards their breeding ponds and there is only 2.5 months to get started with your surveys. This is the only window to undertake eDNA, great crested newt presence/absence and population monitoring surveys to support your planning application. If this window is missed, great crested newts can cause significant delays to your project programmes, and can affect your layout.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 4/03/2016

The British Standard for Biodiversity BS42020 was published in 2013 and the Ecosulis quality system meets the requirements of the standard; however, it is only just starting to filter into planning applications and is becoming increasing recognised as a standard to adhere to. The standard was written for Ecological Consultants, Local Planning Authority ecologists, and anyone else in the ecology profession, to provide a national standard of working. The standard has been written to be used throughout the UK, independent of legislation and policy.

Posted by Sarah Booley on 23/02/2016

To provide an update on the current and emerging trends in biodiversity the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) has assessed 24 different indicators. This aims to provide a clear way to identify and address problems facing biodiversity in the UK. These indicators have been based on a total of fifty measures and the full report can be found here.

Posted by Frances Bennett on 23/02/2016

After two record breaking months this winter with December being the warmest and January the wettest since records began, wildlife has been up to some very strange things these past weeks. There have been records of both flora and fauna exhibiting unseasonable behaviour including the appearance of daffodils as early as the middle of December, hedgehogs remaining active and bats recorded foraging regularly over the Christmas period, when they both should have been deep in hibernation.